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Average Monthly Campground Rates, You Might Be Shocked

Many people go camping for only a week or two, but some choose to go for an extended trip. This can be anywhere from a month-long visit to a year-long stay. In many instances, if you are staying for longer than a couple of weeks the campground will charge you a monthly rate.

The monthly rate varies by campground, season, type of campsite, and more. You will certainly want to call ahead to check the rates and availability at your chosen camping location.

With that said, at most state or national parks, you can expect to pay $500 to $600 per month. For a KOA campground, you can expect to pay between $600 to $700 per month. If you are going high end, like the Malibu Beach RV Park, you can expect to pay between $3200 to $5000 per month.

Choosing to extend your stay at a campground can make your trip more enjoyable in several ways. Not only will you be able to explore the local area better but you can also get better acquainted with your fellow campers and campground host. Additionally, many monthly rates are far cheaper than nightly rates.

Why Go for the Monthly Rate?

Staying at the same campground long enough to qualify for the monthly rate has a host of benefits. First off, it is a great cost-saving measure. In most cases the monthly rate will be discounted and cheaper than the nightly rate.

Good news when you consider nightly rates can cost anywhere from $25 to $50 per night. Therefore if you stayed thirty nights or a month, you could pay as much as $1500. But with a monthly rate, you will probably end up paying closer to $500 for a thirty-day stay.

On top of saving money, a month-long stay gives you a great home base. You can explore the local area more in-depth than if you were only staying for a week or two. It is a great way to take advantage of everything your destination has to offer including events and attractions.

Many full-time RV’ers often stay for longer periods at each campground and get to know their neighbors. It can be exhausting traveling from place to place all the time and sometimes you just need some stillness. A month-long stay should be just the thing to give you a brief reprieve before you hit the road again.

Most people do not tent camp for a month, but it may be possible at some campgrounds. Often, those who partake in month-long campground rates are RV’ers.

How Much Will I Pay?

As mentioned, daily rates at an average campground hover around $50. Popular campgrounds or those with luxury amenities can cost upwards of $75. But the monthly rate rarely equates to paying the nightly rate for thirty days straight. In reality, you can expect to pay anywhere from $500 (modest to average campgrounds) to $1000 (upscale campgrounds) each month.

However, this is typically only the base cost. It will not usually include WiFi or electricity. If you are RVing you will also need to visit the dump station regularly. Thankfully, some campgrounds include free WiFi, though it may get bogged down and slow at times. Also, there are ways to keep your electricity bill down.

Not using your heating or A/C 24/7 will lower your electricity costs. Additionally, being mindful of your appliance usage in your RV can help. If you are tent camping it will be pretty difficult to rack up any substantial bill just due to your accommodations.

Below are some examples of monthly rates. KOA’s are one of the most popular campground destinations so we will start there.

For the Freeport/Durham Maine KOA the rates are as follows:

All Season Super Deal: a month-long stay is 53% off the daily rate. $540 plus tax. Includes electricity (30 amp) and water, one pump-out per week.

That comes out to only $18 per day. However, it is limited to four campsites.

Pre-Season Monthly Rates: a month-long stay is 50% off the daily rate.

Electricity and water included, 30 amp, one pump-out per week – $555

Electricity/water/sewer, 30 amp – $667

Electricity/water/sewer, 50 amp – $765

*does not include tax

In-Season Monthly Rates: a month-long stay gets you 35% off the daily rate

Electricity and water included, 30 amp, one pump-out per week – $830

Electricity/water/sewer, 30 amp – $985

Electricity/water/sewer, 50 amp – $1111

*Does not include tax

Postseason Monthly Rates: a month-long stay is 50% off the daily rate

Electricity and water included, 30 amp, one pump-out per week – $555

Electricity/water/sewer, 30 amp – $667

Electricity/water/sewer, 50 amp – $765

*Does not include tax

In addition, this campground has the following caveats:

  • The rates listed above are only for two people per site. Each additional person will cost an additional $1.00 per day.
  • A $100 non-refundable deposit is mandatory. If you are staying for more than one month you must put your credit card on file.
  • Guests will be charged $7.00 per adult and $5.00 per child or a seasonal pass for $225.
  • Each pump-out beyond your weekly included pump-out will cost $10
  • A golf cart fee is $100

So as you can see the monthly rate is considerably cheaper than paying the nightly rate for thirty consecutive nights.

Let’s check out another. Here are the monthly rates for Fish Lake Beach Camping Resort in Volo Illinois.

They also reduce their daily rate for those that are staying a month or longer.

A monthly site has the following available options WiFi, water, sewer, and 30/50 – amp metered electric. However, electricity is charged by the kilowatt based on the total usage (start meter to end meter). The monthly rate also includes the following amenities: heated pool, hot tub, lake, and the dog park.

  • Peak Season – $750 per month
  • Off-Peak Season – $650 per month

Similar to the KOA campground, the monthly site rate is for two adults and (at most) two kids.

Some campgrounds charge weekly rates instead of monthly. The weekly rates are still a deal compared to the nightly rate. For example, let’s look at Indian Creek Campground in Michigan.

Prime, full hook-up with 50-amp – $360 per week (their daily rate is $60)

Prime, full hook-up with 30-amp – $330 per week (daily rate is $55)

Sewer, water, electricity back-in with 30-amp – $294 per week

Sewer, water, electricity pull-thru with 30-amp – $276 per week

Water and electric tent or camper – $270 per week

Electric-only tent or camper – $264 per week

Rustic tent site – $228 per week

Finally, here is a look at a relatively expensive campground, the Malibu Beach RV Park in Malibu, California.

Summer Rates (Max stay is 28 nights)

Full hook-up ocean view premium, 50 amp – $5560 per month

Full hook-up ocean view premium, 30 amp – $4640 per month

Full hook-up ocean view, 50 amp – $4880 per month

Full hook-up ocean view, 30 amp – $4420 per month

Full hook-up mountain view premium, 50 amp – $4040 per month

Full hook-up mountain view 50 amp or premium 30 amp – $3800 per month

Full hook-up mountain view 30 amp – $3060 per month

  • Fall Rates (Max stay is 28 nights)

Full hook-up ocean view premium, 50 amp – $2755.20 per month

Full hook-up ocean view premium, 30 amp – $2495.10 per month

Full hook-up ocean view, 50 amp – $2625 per month

Full hook-up ocean view, 30 amp – $2365.20 per month

Full hook-up mountain view premium, 50 amp – $2650.20 per month

Full hook-up mountain view 50 amp or premium 30 amp – $2235 per month

Full hook-up mountain view 30 amp – $1585 per month

  • Winter Rates (max stay 30 nights)

Full hook-up ocean view premium, 50 amp – $2495.10 per month

Full hook-up ocean view premium, 30 amp – $2235 per month

Full hook-up ocean view, 50 amp – $2365.20 per month

Full hook-up ocean view, 30 amp – $2105.10 per month

Full hook-up mountain view premium, 50 amp – $2365.20 per month

Full hook-up mountain view 50 amp or premium 30 amp – $1975.20 per month

Full hook-up mountain view 30 amp – $1585.20 per month

  • Spring Rates (max stay 30 nights)

Full hook-up ocean view premium, 50 amp – $2495.10 per month

Full hook-up ocean view premium, 30 amp – $2235 per month

Full hook-up ocean view, 50 amp – $2365.20 per month

Full hook-up ocean view, 30 amp – $2105.10 per month

Full hook-up mountain view premium, 50 amp – $2365.20 per month

Full hook-up mountain view 50 amp or premium 30 amp – $1975.20 per month

Full hook-up mountain view 30 amp – $1585.20 per month

Their tent sites do not have monthly rates, only weekly, and vary from $257 per week ($1028 per month) to $410 per week ($1640 per month) depending on the season.

Some campgrounds may offer glamping experiences, which can be a cabin, a yurt, or another upscale dwelling. In most cases, you will not be able to book these for a month. This is largely due to the fact that most campgrounds have very limited glamping accommodations available, and therefore limit how long guests can stay in them.

For example, Campers Inn in Panama City Beach, Florida only allows a maximum two week stay in one of their cabins. Their weekly rate is $450 for four people.

Another thing about some long-term campsites is special features. Some may include a deck or patio that you can enjoy in addition to the standard picnic table and fire ring. Oftentimes, long term sites may be more peaceful and secluded; out of the way of popular foot traffic areas.

Some campgrounds may also give you the option of having your mail delivered to the campground. This can help with paying monthly bills on your permanent home and staying in contact while you are away.

As you can see by the range of rates above, if you are planning on staying long term at a campground it can be a good idea to shop around. Once you know your destination, check out nearby campgrounds to try and find the lowest rate. Chances are if you look a little outside of the most popular city or the main area you may find a campground that is cheaper while still close enough to attractions and tourist spots.

What You Need to Know About an Extended Stay

Embarking on a long-term camping trip can be a little more complex than just going for a week or two. There are more things to think about, more tasks to complete before you leave, and certainly more items to pack.

What to Pack

What you need to pack for your camping trip really depends on where and how you will be camping. If you intend to park your RV somewhere for a month or longer than your main considerations may be comfort and convenience. However, if you are planning on hiking the PCT or wilderness camping for an extended period, you will probably want to focus on self-reliance and sustainability.

In either case, it can be a good idea to start with the KISS method or Keep It Simple Stupid. Employing this tactic can help you pack lighter, more efficiently, and supply you with only what you need to stay safe and comfortable instead of bringing various items that you may use rarely or never.

What to Pack for a Rugged Trip

Water and Food. You will need to take some water along with you, but also water bottles and a way to get and purify more water. This is especially true if you will be on the move regularly or if you are not located near a fresh public water source. Bringing enough food can be quite difficult. You will need food that is simple to cook and some that require no heating or cooking at all. Bringing enough food for a month can be difficult even with a car or RV, so you may likely need to make a run into town to restock a few times throughout the course of your trip.

Navigation tools. You will probably want a map, a compass, and possibly even a GPS or satellite phone.

First Aid. the further away you are from civilization the more robust your first-aid kit will need to be. This is an item you certainly don’t want to skimp on.

Accommodations. Or more accurately shelter. In the most basic terms a tent, but you may also need a rain fly, a tarp or two, and possibly even a tent repair kit.

Tools. A multi-tool is essential. It can also be a good idea to pack a few tools for your vehicle if you are driving. And of course, you will probably want a hatchet to cut wood, a hammer to pound in stakes, and any other odd or end you may need depending on what equipment you are taking.

Fire. It is a good idea to take a few different kinds of fire starters. You can include commercial options and homemade starters like petroleum jelly soaked cotton pads.

Lights and Signals. A lantern, a flashlight, a headlamp, and maybe more than one. Don’t forget the batteries. In addition, remember to pack an emergency flare or whistle if you will really be out on your own.

Then of course you will need your hygiene items, clothing, and any other outdoor gear. It can be a fine balance between being prepared and overpacking. It is a good idea to camp for a few days to test out if you have everything you need (or too much) before setting off on an extended trip.

Packing When RVing or Relaxed Camping

When you are camping in an established campground near to civilization, you can be a bit more relaxed with what you pack. You will still want to use the KISS method and maybe leave the espresso machine at home, but you can certainly bring more comfort items.

The list for relaxed camping is nearly the same as the above checklist. However, you may need fewer tools and signal options, a less robust first aid kit, and less food and water as you will probably be able to grocery shop whenever you choose.

You can also add things that will make your trip more pleasant and enjoyable. This means feel free to pack the blender, the outdoor sound system, and the hammock. As long as you are conscious of your vehicle or RV weight limits feel free to splurge a little with the comfort items.

Be a Part of a Camping Community

One unique feature of an extended stay at a campground is being part of a camping community. Some campgrounds cater to regular, extended campers, and others will probably have at least a handful of guests who park it for an entire season. This can be a wonderful opportunity to get to know your campground neighbors and make new friends.

Choose Your Location Wisely

This is more applicable to those staying in a designated campground either in a tent, camper, or an RV. If you are dispersed camping or hiking you have fewer choices when it comes to location and you very well be on the move much of the time anyway.

That being said, if you are looking at an extended stay at a campground it can be beneficial to search specifically for long-term campgrounds or RV parks. You will often get the best deal and are likely to find monthly rates instead of daily or weekly.

Know though that usually, these campgrounds are more residential and maybe a little out of the way. In most cases, the most popular and center-of-the-action campgrounds have a high guest turn over rate. They usually don’t have monthly rates and can also have limits on how long you are allowed to stay.

So you may be a little further from the tourist attractions but if you are staying longer than a week you will probably enjoy having a place to get away from it all. Another consideration when checking out campgrounds is the amenities offered.

Because this will be your new (temporary) home, think about all the things you may want or need to be comfortable and content. This can mean being near to a church you are affiliated with. You may want a gym nearby. Does the campground have a pool or a playground? This is especially important if you are camping with your children.

Aside from wants, think about needs too. You will probably want a laundromat nearby if you are not equipped with a washing machine and dryer. A nearby grocery store is another essential.

Make sure to do thorough research and investigate all the campgrounds near to your destination that could be an option. It would be a shame to book a month-long stay only to find out your accommodations are dismal and as a result be miserable for weeks.

Securing Your Spot

Once you have decided on your campground, you will need to make the reservation. It can be more difficult to book a month-long stay than a short term stay. This is even more true if you are looking at camping during the popular summer season.

Plan on calling one to three months ahead of the date you are hoping to book. Some long term campground reservations are also a bit more involved than if you were to reserve a short term stay.

A deposit is usually a given. However, some places require a rental process similar to renting an apartment. You may have to fill out an application and go through a background check before you can sign an agreement. You may even have to pay an application fee.

Pull-in and Stay Awhile

But in the end, this is a small price to pay to stay in a great camping community where you can feel safe and comfortable around your fellow campers. Long term campgrounds can be very clean, friendly, and really cater to their guests who they often get to know so well.

Many long term RVers choose to return year after year, some booking an entire season at the same campground. This just goes to show that choosing the monthly campground rate option can have a host of wonderful benefits.

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Rickie Arms

Hi, I'm Rickie Arms, owner of Glampingorcamping.com. I am so invested in writing the best and most informative articles for you that I went out and bought a travel trailer just so I could write about it for you. I spend just about all of my off time both camping and glamping so I can share everything I have learned and will learn with you. I have spent my whole life camping and over the last 10 years, I have spent a large amount of time checking out glamping experiences with my wife and kids as well. Thank you for coming by and we hope to see you back here getting great information in the future. Rick Arms-

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