How Tall is an RV Garage Storage Door? ( List by RV type )


It can be pricey to store your RV during the colder months and leaving it exposed to the elements isn’t really an option. If you would like to store your RV in your own garage, you will need to take into account your motorhome’s length, width, and height.

So how tall is an RV Garage Door?

The size of the storage garage door you will need depends on your RVs height. RVs and trailers can range from nine to thirteen feet in height. With the average RV Garage door height being about thirteen feet. If you want to be sure that your RV will fit and not risk scraping the ceiling, a door around sixteen feet should be more than adequate.

Most homes attached garages will not accommodate an RV. If you hope to store your RV at home you will likely need to build a new storage space or make use of a pole barn. There are a variety of things to consider when constructing an RV storage garage.

Why Store at Home?

Paying for RV storage during the winter can certainly create a dent in your budget. Some storage facilities simply use outdoor lots that are either gravel or paved. Other storage facilities provide indoor accommodations that may even be heated.

An outdoor lot can range from thirty dollars to around one hundred dollars a month. An unheated indoor storage facility can charge anywhere from fifty dollars to one-hundred and twenty-five a month. The most expensive, a heated indoor storage unit, can run from one hundred dollars a month to four-hundred fifty a month.

These prices will vary based on the storage facility’s location, the size of your RV, and any additional items offered. Some storage facilities will provide you with sewage dumping, security, battery charging, and other maintenance.

The price to store your RV can make ownership very costly. This is why some individuals choose to store their RV on their own property. Additionally, if you are storing your RV on an outdoor lot, you may not be able to take care of it as much as you like.

Storing your RV at home means that you can clean off any ice, debris, or snow, and perform maintenance as often as you see fit.

However, parking your RV in your driveway can be rough on the RV itself, irritating for family members, and even maybe a little unsightly. Some homeowner’s associations and cities prohibit parking large vehicles in your driveway.

Storing your RV in a garage or barn can be a much saner and safer option and extend the life of your RV.

Recommended Garage Door For RVs By Type

As previously mentioned, most home garages will not readily fit a motorhome or camper. You will likely need to build a space or make use of a pole barn. After all, the average height of a standard home garage door is only seven and a half feet.

The dimensions of common RV types and the door clearance required are listed below.

  • Class A: 34-44’ length and 13’ in height, recommended 14’ door clearance
  • Class C: 24-36’ length and 11’ in height, recommended 12’ door clearance
  • Class B: 19-24’ length and 10-11’’ in height, recommended 11’ door clearance
  • Fifth Wheel: 30-36’ length and 12’ in height, recommended 14’ door clearance
  • Travel Trailer: 25-30’ length and 11’ in height, recommended 12’ door clearance
  • Pop-Up Camper: 20-23’ length and 10’ in height, recommended 10’ door clearance

 

It is not just the standard height of your RV, but additional items on the roof that can affect clearance. Some individuals may have AC units, satellites, or even rooftop storage. If these things are not readily removable they will increase the height required.

Class A RVs are the biggest and they can be monstrous. Unless you already have a large storage area, it can be difficult to store a class A motorhome at home.

Class A RVs typically require a garage door that is fourteen to sixteen feet in height.

Class C RVs are the next size down. Class C RVs and especially Class C+ require garage doors that are around fourteen feet in height. In most cases, this size will have AC units or satellites on top.

Class B RVs or camper vans are a bit easier to store. However, they don’t quite fit in a standard garage due to the length and width. A common garage door height for storing this size is twelve feet.

Trailers can be shorter in height but not always in length. Pop-up campers can easily clear a regular garage door when they are compressed. However, the length may be an issue.

Travel trailers come in a plethora of sizes, but on average require a garage door height of twelve feet. The lengths vary widely.

Fifth wheels are pretty on par with RVs. They can be quite tall. Fifth wheels will likely need a garage door height of fourteen feet or more.

The more space, or clearance, you have around your RV or trailer, the easier it will be to park it. It will also be easier to access the RV and parts of the garage when it is in storage.

Figuring Out Dimensions, Models, and Materials

You will want to measure your RV once, twice, and maybe even three times before purchasing building materials. Thankfully, there are many RV storage plans found online and through commercial retailers.

Don’t Forget Length and Width

In addition to the height of your RV, you should also know its length and width. Various factors can influence the bottom-line measurements provided in your RVs specs. Also, try to plan ahead if your RV size could ever increase for any reason.

Mirrors and racks on the back can increase your motorhome’s width. Similarly, racks, hitches, and for fifth wheels towing vehicles, can increase the length.

Class A motorhomes can be very long, just as they can be very tall. With a width of around ten feet, they require a garage door width of twelve feet, the length required can be from thirty-five feet to over forty-five feet.

Class C motorhomes require the same amount of width, about twelve feet due to their ten feet of width. Their length can vary from twenty-one feet to forty-one feet.

Class B motorhomes are a bit smaller. Their width is usually nine feet and therefore they require a garage door width of ten to eleven feet. They are certainly shorter, the length ranging from seventeen feet to nineteen feet.

Pop-up campers are short in height but are still long and wide. The width required is usually about twelve feet and the same for length as they are usually ten to twelve feet long.

Travel trailers can be eighteen to twenty-five feet in length and will need a longer garage space, similar to motorhomes. The width required is on average twelve feet.

Fifth wheels can be as big as Class A motorhomes. They need fourteen feet of width and a lengthy thirty-two feet of space from front to back.

You will need to make sure that you have space on your land to build a storage area. In addition, you should check will all codes in your municipality and your homeowner’s association if you have one.

Determining Your Garage’s Setup and Features

Once you know the necessary dimensions of your storage area you can then determine if you want any additional features. Some individuals prefer a pull-through garage if they have an RV that is big and difficult to maneuver. Still, some might want extra room to store even more items, windows, or a loft area.

Once you have your general plan, you will then need to decide on materials including a heating and/or air conditioning system. Then figure out whether you plan to build it yourself or have someone build it for you.

If you don’t have the time or desire to build an RV storage unit, you can always purchase an RV cover. Just like building a storage space, you will need to know your RVs dimensions.

However, there are a few drawbacks to using a cover instead of a storage space. First, it will not be completely protected from the elements, it will still face the cold, snow, rain, and ice. Additionally, strong winds may cause the cover to flap against your rig, possibly buffing or scratching the paint.

An RV cover can be very difficult to put on and take off, you likely won’t be able to do it by yourself. Once on, you will have little to no access to your RV.

Finally, a cover certainly won’t last as long as a storage garage. After a few seasons outside during the harsh winter months, it may begin to rip or tear.

An Investment, but Worth It

The initial cost of building a storage unit can be daunting. However, it will save you money in the long run when you don’t have to shell out fifty to over three-hundred dollars a month for RV storage. It will also provide you with the peace of mind of having your motorhome or trailer safe, secure, and nearby.

Why Store at Home?

Paying for RV storage during the winter can certainly create a dent in your budget. Some storage facilities simply use outdoor lots that are either gravel or paved. Other storage facilities provide indoor accommodations that may even be heated.

An outdoor lot can range from thirty dollars to around one hundred dollars a month. An unheated indoor storage facility can charge anywhere from fifty dollars to one-hundred and twenty-five a month. The most expensive, heated indoor storage unit, can run from one hundred dollars a month to four-hundred fifty a month.

These prices will vary based on the storage facility’s location, the size of your RV, and any additional items offered. Some storage facilities will provide you with sewage dumping, security, battery charging, and other maintenance.

The price to store your RV can make ownership very costly. This is why some individuals choose to store their RV on their own property. Additionally, if you are storing your RV on an outdoor lot, you may not be able to take care of it as much as you like.

Storing your RV at home means that you can clean off any ice, debris, or snow, and perform maintenance as often as you see fit.

However, parking your RV in your driveway can be rough on the RV itself, irritating for family members, and even maybe a little unsightly. Some homeowner’s associations and cities prohibit parking large vehicles in your driveway.

Storing your RV in a garage or barn can be a much saner and safer option and extend the life of your RV.

More Helpful Article For you.

RV Camping Travel Trailers ( Average Lengths, Heights And Weights )

Average Length Weight Height Of Motorhome ( Class A and C examples )

RV Storage Average Cost ( Motor-home and Travel Trailer in U.S. )

Rickie Arms

Hi, I'm Rickie Arms, owner of Glampingorcamping.com. I am so invested in writing the best and most informative articles for you that I went out and bought a travel trailer just so I could write about it for you. I spend just about all of my off time both camping and glamping so I can share everything I have learned and will learn with you. I have spent my whole life camping and over the last 10 years, I have spent a large amount of time checking out glamping experiences with my wife and kids as well. Thank you for coming by and we hope to see you back here getting great information in the future. Rick Arms-

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